Ch_15_Gestures_and_sign_languages_4-11S

Ch_15_Gestures_and_sign_languages_4-11S - COMD 2050-3...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style COMD 2050-3 4/11/11, 4/25/11 Ch. 15 Gestures and sign Yule, G. (2010). The Study of Language (4th ed.). New York: Cambridge.
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How do you refer to persons with a hearing loss? 22 deaf deaf and dumb hearing impaired deaf-mute hearing- disabled hard-of- hearing
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deaf and dumb” was once neutral The American School for the Deaf William “Dummy” Hoy “deaf-mute” was similarly an acceptable term. Gallaudet University, formerly known as “National Deaf-Mute College.” Deaf clung to the term; oralists 33
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Legislation such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and American with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, changed the terminology we use, focusing attention on the person rather than the disability. Members of the Deaf community regard “hearing-impaired” as negative. 44
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What’s the difference between “Deaf” and “deaf?” Deaf ( sometimes verbalized as “big d deaf”) is a reference to a cultural group; a community of people who share a common language (American Sign Language) and culture (art, social practices, entertainment (theater), recreation (sports), etc. regardless of their degree of hearing loss. 55
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deaf (sometimes verbalized as “little d deaf”) is an adjective that indicates a person with a hearing loss. People who have a mild or moderate hearing loss may refer to themselves as hard-of-hearing , but some audiologically hard-of-hearing individuals may refer to themselves as Deaf. Identity is a personal choice. 66
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Ch_15_Gestures_and_sign_languages_4-11S - COMD 2050-3...

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