lecture08.0125 - Ah, how the professor can mislead! Dear...

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1 Ah, how the professor can mislead! Dear Tom, I noticed that you glossed the Greek root for the word "ethnicity" as  "heathen" in your PowerPoint of last Friday. The original sense of  the Greek is "nation" or "group", from ethne. The use of "ethnic" to  mean "heathen" is a later development. Just thought I'd let you know!
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2 And what is culture?  “Models of …”  Think of  McHugh a kind of metaphor for this idea: “Yo u c o uld s e e  fra m e s  o f the  wo rld thro ug h the   g a te wa y, like  im a g e s  o n a  film : a  b o y with a  b a s ke t o f  g ra s s , s o m e o ne  driving  a  b uffa lo  in fro m  the  pa s ture ,  two  little  g irls  running  up the  pa th la ug hing , b a ng le   s e lle rs  fro m  do wn in the  va lle y wa lking  he a vily with  b ig  b a s ke ts  o f wa re s .”
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3 The “naturalness” of culture… the sense of it being in the body, of being unconscious: “I fumbled with my food, not used to scooping it up with my hands.  This process  looked elegant when the others did it . . . .  I was all elbows and wrists, angular  and clumsy, not rounded and delicate like them.  I felt awkward.  Sitting cross- legged, my back hurt and my knees jutted up like a grasshopper’s rather than  lying neatly on the floor.”
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4 What it means to be an “outsider” the dislocation felt when you are outside of your own cultural world: “I la y the re  wo nde ring  wha t s tra ng e  wo rld I ha d e nte re d,  fe e ling  the  full fo rc e  o f m y he lple s s ne s s .” “. . . I wa s  inc o m pe te nt a t ne a rly e ve rything .  I c rie d a   lo t.  I wa nte d to  g o  ho m e .”
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5 the sense, of being an object, of not quite being regarded as human: “Seeing me, they decided to linger a while before going on.  One girl took my arm and  began to talk rapidly to her friends.  The only word I caught was ‘white.’” “’She can’t talk,’ Ama said.  I felt a little hurt.” “Newcomer to villager: ‘What’s that?’  (They meant me.) “Neighbor: ‘Who knows? It belongs to Lalita.’” “I couldn’t talk.  I couldn’t eat.  I couldn’t sit.  I was a nuisance on the trails . . . .”
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6 The sense of meaning… “She pulled back the sleeve and touched the skin.  ‘Are you a  widow?’ she asked. . . ‘No marriage,” I replied.  She showed me her  wrist, decorated with red glass bangles.  They looked pretty in the  sun and jingled when she moved.  ‘Wear these,’ she said.  ‘Only 
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course ANTHRO 101 taught by Professor Peters during the Winter '08 term at University of Michigan.

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lecture08.0125 - Ah, how the professor can mislead! Dear...

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