PSY 130 A History of Modern Psychology

PSY 130 A History of Modern Psychology - Schools of thought...

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Schools of thought give rise to human understanding The early teachings in philosophy are credited to Socrates, his student Plato and his subsequent student Aristotle. Under the influence of Socrates, Plato developed into a founding father of philosophy of the Western world, instructing others in what would form the basis of modern philosophy. The great studies of the ancestral traces of early philosophy credit Plato with formation of principle concepts upon which main schools of thought were developed by his student Aristotle (Taylor et al. , page 1). Understanding the basis upon which modern psychology is derived helps form a deeper contextual appreciation of current theories. The two major schools of thought that were formed early in philosophy are monoism and dualism. Monoism is the idea that mind and body are one, working together to form responses to external cues. First proposed by Parmenides in the fifth century, this idea was expanded upon much some 1200 years later in by the 17 th century rationalist Baruch Spinoza. There are two subsets of monoism, physicalists and idealists. Favoring physicality as the sole controlling entity with the mind merely a reflection of that control are the physicalists. Idealists purport that the mind alone constructs reality and that physical entities are merely an illusion brought about by the mind. Dualism was essentially refined by Descartes in the 17
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PSY 130 A History of Modern Psychology - Schools of thought...

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