Written Assignment 6 - Logical Fallacies

Written Assignment 6 - Logical Fallacies - Critical...

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Critical Thinking for Homeland Security 2010-04-HLS-355-OL009 Written Assignment 6 By Gabriel A. Godart Thomas Edison State College. 1. This is an appeal to a lack of evidence. The author implies that the suburban house must have something wrong just because it is less expensive the other one. A point is made without proper information. 2. In this example, the author uses the appeal to emotion by bringing up the fact that life has been really difficult lately, which seems misplaced in his or her request for a promotion. 3. This is clearly a personal attack against the person who made negative arguments about one’s politics. This fallacy is known as Ad Hominem. 4. In this case, what the author makes the faulty assumption that because people take more seriously what they have to pay for, and then students paying their way to college are more serious students than those who don’t. The author committed the wishful thinking fallacy. 5. In this glittering generality, the author uses vague emotionally appealing virtue words such as “imaginative” and “different” that disposes the reader to approve the argument. 6. Descartes gives us here a false cause. He establishes a cause/effect relationship that does not exist.
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7. We can discern two types of fallacies in this example. The first one is the appeal to emotion by mentioning the war on terror and using the fact that voting
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This note was uploaded on 05/10/2011 for the course HLS 355 taught by Professor Denis during the Spring '10 term at Thomas Edison State.

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Written Assignment 6 - Logical Fallacies - Critical...

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