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11-22Archaea and bacteria_Lecture 34

11-22Archaea and bacteria_Lecture 34 - Bacteria Archaea...

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5/10/11 Bacteria & Archaea Diversity & evolution Structure & motility Reproduction Nutrition & metabolism Ecological roles The word “bacteria” is plural “bacterium” is singular. There is no such thing as “a bacteria” or “bacterias.”
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5/10/11 Archaea are known for the ability of some species to survive in extremely hot, acidic or salty habitats. Ancestry of eukaryotic nucleocytoplasm Bacteria include 50+ phyla
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5/10/11 Proteobacteria--diverse metabolic types; symbionts; original source of cellular mitochondria Cyanobacteria--oxygen-producing photosynthesizers; produced Earth’s first oxygen-rich atmosphere; original source of cellular plastids; sometimes produce toxic blooms
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5/10/11 Anabaena “I will rise up”
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5/10/11 Bacterial cell & body shape variation Spherical cocci rod-shaped bacilli comma-shaped vibrios spiral-shaped spirilli, spirochaetes Unicells colonies filaments branched filaments
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5/10/11 Many bacteria use Chemical communication to aggregate cells into biofilms that attach to surfaces by mucilage Medical, ecological & industrial Importance Example: Dental plaque
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