report 8... - Report of 8th Experiment Value of g Simple...

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Report of 8 th Experiment Value of ‘g’
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Simple Pendulum: A simple pendulum is one which can be considered to be a point mass suspended from a string or rod of negligible mass. It is a resonant system with a single resonant frequency. For small amplitudes, the period of such a pendulum can be approximated by: Compound pendulum: In mathematics , in the area of dynamical systems , a double pendulum is a pendulum with another pendulum attached to its end, and is a simple physical system that exhibits rich dynamic behavior . The motion of a double pendulum is governed by a set of coupled ordinary differential equations . For certain energies its motion is chaotic . Several variants of the double pendulum may be considered; the two limbs may be of equal or unequal lengths and masses, they may be simple pendulums or compound pendulums (also called complex pendulums) and the motion may be in three dimensions or restricted to the vertical plane. In a compound pendulum, the mass is distributed along its length. If the mass is evenly distributed, then the centre of mass of each limb is at its midpoint, and the limb has a moment of inertia of about that point. Bar pendulum: A Kater's pendulum is a reversible freeswinging pendulum invented by British physicist and army captain Henry Kater in 1817 [1] for use as a gravimeter instrument to measure the local acceleration of gravity . Its advantage is that, unlike previous pendulum gravimetry methods, the pendulum's centre of gravity and center of oscillation don't have to be determined, allowing greater accuracy. The pendulum consists of a rigid metal bar with two pivot points, one near each end of the bar. It can be suspended from either pivot and swung. It also has either an adjustable weight that can be moved up and down the bar, or one adjustable pivot, to adjust the periods of swing. In use, it is swung from one pivot, and the period timed, and then turned upside down and swung from the other pivot, and the period timed. The moveable weight (or pivot) is adjusted until the two periods are equal. At this point the period is equal to the period of an 'ideal' simple pendulum of length equal to the distance between the pivots. From the period and the measured distance between the
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pivots, the acceleration of gravity can be calculated with great precision from the periodicity equation for a simple pendulum. STOPWATCH:
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This note was uploaded on 05/11/2011 for the course UBIT 411 taught by Professor Saleemelahi during the Spring '10 term at University of Karachi.

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report 8... - Report of 8th Experiment Value of g Simple...

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