Chapter 3 - Business-to-Business Marketing Lecture 2b...

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Unformatted text preview: Business-to-Business Marketing Lecture 2b Inter-Firm (buyer-seller) Relationships and Networks B2B relationships Traditional approach to B2B marketing (the 4 “Ps”) Seller and the buyer operate separately Seller and buyer conflicting cost-based interests Seller is “active” but buyer “passive” Marketing involves studying of the customer’s buying process Traditional approach in B2B criticized on the grounds: of lacking relevance to the “real” way business are taking place nowadays, since the buyer is as active as the seller , thus the buying process involves interaction over time, so economic well-being of both parts depends on the quality of the relationship Lecture 2b: Inter-firm Relationships and Networks As well as an understanding of the behaviour of the buying company , − business marketers also have to understand the relationship between the buying company and the selling company. Relationships are two-sided ; treating customers as passive recipients of the attentions of the marketer is a naïve view of business marketing and inherently flawed . Successful B2B means cultivating the ability to reduce the uncertainties faced by both parties Lecture 2b: Inter-firm Relationships and Networks Example: Marks & Spencer called the “manufacturer without factories”! see box 3.1, pp.59 -Capacity uncertainty-Application uncertainty-Transaction uncertainty-Problem-solving ability-Transfer ability SELLER e.g. clothing co.-Need uncertainty-Market uncertainty-Transaction uncertainty-Demand ability-Transfer ability BUYER e.g. M&S Figure 3.1 Matching uncertainties and abilities ( Source : Ford et al., 1998:18) Lecture 2b: Inter-firm Relationships and Networks what and how much to buy whom to buy from what happens if.. (exposure) Focus on solving the customer’s problem Min. exposure (e.g. trials or short contracts) how much to buy (planning) what to buy (planning) what happens if.. (exposure) Focus on solving end-customers’ problems Min. exposure (e.g. competitive retail strategy) Relationship theories and variables A range of variables can characterize business relationships “ Relationship-based theories” No scientific consensus on the sufficient set of variables (no absolutely inclusive theory) Each theory tends to emphasise different relationship aspects Depending on the issue in a relationship, draw useful lessons from all perspectives Lecture 2b: Inter-firm Relationships and Networks Principal variable(s) Level of emphasis Major theoretical source Theory type Typical reference sources Risk and its management...
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This note was uploaded on 05/12/2011 for the course MARKETING 222 taught by Professor Antonios during the Spring '11 term at Aarhus Universitet.

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Chapter 3 - Business-to-Business Marketing Lecture 2b...

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