Notes 9 - HTTPProtocol

Notes 9 - HTTPProtocol - Lecture The HTTP Protocol...

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HTTP Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 1 Lecture The HTTP Protocol
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HTTP Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 2 Outline • Overall Operation • Persistent Connections • Authentication • HTTP Requests • HTTP Methods • HTTP Headers - General • HTTP Headers - Request • HTTP Headers - Response • HTTP Headers - Entity • Status Codes
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HTTP Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 3 What Does the WWW Server Do? •Enables browser requests •Provides – Support for retrieving hypertext documents – Manages access to the Web site – Supports clickable image maps (SSIM) – Provides several mechanisms for executing server-side scripts • C ommon G ateway I nterface (CGI) • A pplication P rogrammers I nterface (API) – produces log files and usage statistics
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HTTP Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 4 How Does a Web Server Communicate? • Web browsers and Web servers communicate using a protocol known as H yperT ext T ransfer P rotocol (HTTP) • HTTP is a lightweight protocol – Similar to the Gopher protocol – different from the ftp protocol • ftp sessions are long lived and there are two connections, one for control, one for data • Current HTTP protocol is version 1.1 • Updates to HTTP are controlled by the WWW Consortium (W3C), – http://www.w3.org/Protocols/
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HTTP Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 5 HTTP History The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems. The first version of HTTP, HTTP/0.9, was a simple protocol for raw data transfer across the Internet. HTTP/1.0, is defined by RFC 1945, see – http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc1945/rfc1945 HTTP/1.0 allows messages to be in the format of MIME-like messages, containing meta-information about the data transferred and modifiers on the request/response semantics. HTTP/1.1, is defined by RFC 2616, see – http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616 HTTP/1.1 extends the protocol to handle: – the effects of hierarchical proxies – caching – the need for persistent connections – virtual hosts
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Copyright © Ellis Horowitz 6 MIME MEDIA TYPES HTTP tags all data that it sends with its MIME type HTTP sends the media type of the file using the Content-Type: header For example Content-type: image/jpeg Content-length: 1598 Some important media types are – text/plain, text/html – image/gif, image/jpeg – audio/basic, audio/wav, audio/x-pn-realaudio – model/vrml – video/mpeg, video/quicktime, video/vnd.rn- realmedia, video/x-ms-wmv – application/*, application-specific data that does not fall under any other MIME category, e.g. application/vnd.ms-powerpoint
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This note was uploaded on 05/12/2011 for the course CSCI 571 taught by Professor Papa during the Fall '07 term at USC.

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Notes 9 - HTTPProtocol - Lecture The HTTP Protocol...

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