Performing Poetry - a guide for teachers

Performing Poetry - a guide for teachers - Performing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Performing Poetry: A Study Guide for Teachers Voice Emphasis Exercises Purpose : To have students learn the importance of varying the pitch, rate and volume of their voices. Emphasizing different words will alter the meaning of the poem that the students are reading. Exercise #1: 1. Use the following poem by Bruce Lansky for this exercise. My Baby Sister My baby sister’s really swell. I love her smile, but not her smell. (Note: All poems used in this study guide are copyright by Bruce Lansky.) 2. Have students take turns reading the poem emphasizing one word over the others. For example the first student reads it emphasizing "My" and the second student reads the poem emphasizing "baby," and so on until the last student has read the poem emphasizing the last word "smell." 3. Reading the selected word with emphasis means to say it louder, slower and more dramatically than the other words in the poem. If you emphasize "My" it means my baby sister as opposed to yours. If you emphasize "baby" it may mean your baby sister as opposed to your older sister. 4. Discuss how the meaning of the poem changes as different words are emphasized. 5. Teach your students that as they practice other poems to present in class that they can decide which words to emphasize. They can underline these words so that they can identify these words as they practice their poems. Exercise #2: Many students speak too quickly when presenting poems in front of the class or an audience. Your pitch and volume can vary more when you slow down your rate of speech. 1. Use the following poem by Bruce Lansky for this exercise: I’d Rather I’d rather wash the dishes I’d rather kiss a frog. I’d rather get an F in math or run a ten-mile jog. I’d rather do my homework. I’d rather mow the lawn. I’d rather take the garbage out. I’d rather wake at dawn. I’d rather dine on Brussels sprouts or catch the chicken pox. I’d rather do most anything than clean the litter box. 2. Have a student volunteer to read the poem slowly, much slower than she/he would if they were actually presenting to the class. 3. Now have a student volunteer to read the poem quickly. Tell then to read it as quick as she/he possibly can. 4. Discuss the effectiveness of both readings.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
5. Lastly, have a student read the poem at a rate between fast and slow. Quick enough to maintain an interest of the listeners yet slow enough to enunciate each word clearly and at a pace which enables the reader to ad emphasis through his/her pitch, volume, and rate. 6. You can have students read the poem in pairs. The reading should take approximately seconds. Variations: You may want to break up your class into small groups to do this exercise or assign it for homework to be done with parents participating. Exercise #3:
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Performing Poetry - a guide for teachers - Performing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online