Central_America_1_ - Central America Click to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/16/11 In America’s Backyard Central America
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5/16/11 Central America’s ethnic or racial divisions differ in terminology from other regions in Latin America: A few whites held the top positions. Ladinos, about 31 % in 1825, refers to acculturated Indians and people of African and mixed descent who speak Spanish. The 65 % Indian population refers to those who were culturally distinct, mostly Maya. Jamaican and West Indian plantation workers resided on the Atlantic Coast, a region influenced by the British. The Ethnic Background
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5/16/11 Maya Language Map
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5/16/11 Maya Region
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5/16/11
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5/16/11
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5/16/11 Liberals, who favored separation from Mexico, briefly held the upper hand. 1830: Honduran-born Francisco Morazán became president and led Liberal government for 8 years. Guatemala’s experiment with liberal ideas included: Anti-clerical reforms. School system that attempted to teach the indigenous population Spanish. Conservatives vs. Liberals
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5/16/11 Guatemala’s liberal experiment under Dr. Mariano Gálvez: First national theater, museum, and public library opened. Consulado abolished Land offered to European and North American colonizers. Anti-clerical reforms: confiscation of regular orders’ property control over birth and marriage registry priests exiled divorce legalized tithe abolished education system secularized Besides Church lands, communal lands known as ejidos also were taken from Indians and placed in wealthy private hands.
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5/16/11 1837: Revolt in Western Highlands preceded Carrera’s revolt. 1837-38: Rafael Carrera, a Mestizo swineherd, led an uprising from the of mostly Indian and mestizos, taking Guatemala City in 1838. Opportunistic liberals supported him to overthrow Dr. Mariano Gálvez. 1838: Carrera successfully overthrew Gálvez. 1839: Carrera successfully defeated Francisco Morazán He announced withdrawal of Guatemala from the federal system of Central America. Remaining provinces of Central America – El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica achieved independence as well. Carrera and Conservative Rule
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Rafael Carrera, Dictator for Life Carrera’s program involved a rolling back of liberal reforms. Restored powers of the Church, invited back exiled clergy. Protected Indian land and attempted to enforce geographic separation to prevent abuses from taking place. 1842: Morazán killed after attempt to regain control. 1844: Carrera became president and re- elected in 1847. 1850s: Carrera reaches peak of power, gained support from Conservative creoles. 1854: Made dictator for life
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2011 for the course HIST 352 taught by Professor Drlentz during the Spring '11 term at University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

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Central_America_1_ - Central America Click to edit Master...

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