The_Colonial_Legacy_in_Modern_Latin_America2_1_

The_Colonial_Legacy_in_Modern_Latin_America2_1_ - Term...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Term “Latin America” emerged in the mid-19th c. 1856: Apparently first used by a Colombian, José María Caicedo Adopted by the French under Napoleon III to provide ideological cover for his imperial and colonial ambitions in the Americas. Marked a shift away from an identity as Hispanic, or Ibero-America to Latin America From Marshall Eakin, “ Does Latin America Have a Common History?”
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Late 1950s: Dependency Theory developed under the guidance of the Director of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America, Raul Prebisch. Noted that economic growth in the advanced industrialized countries did not necessarily lead to growth in the poorer countries. Neoclassical theory had assumed that economic growth was beneficial to all. Prebisch's explanation: Poor countries exported primary commodities to the rich countries who then manufactured products out of those commodities and sold them back to the poorer countries.
Background image of page 2
Latin America’s Imperial Past
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Habsburg dynasty of Spain, begun by Charles V (1517-1555), was left without an heir when Charles II died childless in 1700. 1600-1700: Spanish government of the Americas in decline: Less revenue from mines. Rampant corruption in government affairs. Military and economic encroachment by British and French. Native population continues to decline.
Background image of page 4
The Bourbon Reforms: 1700-1812 The American Revolution: 1776 The French Revolution: 1789 The Haitian Revolution: 1791 Napoleonic Wars: 1799-1814
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Enlightenment ideals such as anti- clericalism and efficiency appealed to the Bourbons. Land and wealth held by the Church was also frowned upon and viewed as unproductive by Bourbon monarchs. The devout religiosity of the majority of the Americas, especially the elaborate ceremonies and festivals, were viewed as wasteful. Other ideals, such as the notion of consent of the governed, did not appeal to the absolutist monarchs.
Background image of page 6
Freer Trade: Inefficient Mercantilist System (Fleet System) was loosened. More communication and interaction between ports led to freer trade of ideas as well as goods. Trade between ports also contributed to notions of self- sufficiency. Favoring of
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

The_Colonial_Legacy_in_Modern_Latin_America2_1_ - Term...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online