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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/16/11 The Mexican Revolution The Militant Phase, 1910-1919 5/16/11 Background:  The Porfiriato 5/16/11 Porfirio Diaz:  José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz (b. September 15, 1830) born in Oaxaca; descended from both Mixtecs and Spaniards.  1846: Joined the militia to fight against the US.  1849: Studied law.  Was tutored by Benito Juarez, a Zapotec Indian lawyer.  1853-1855: Publicly opposed Santa Anna as a liberal fighter.  1855: Díaz was rewarded by being named subprefect of the predominantly Indian 5/16/11 Rising through the Ranks  1857-1860: War of the Reform An effective fighter for the victorious liberals, Díaz became a colonel in the national army.  5 May 1862: Battle of Puebla Díaz temporarily stopped the French army advance on Mexico City earning promotion to brigadier general.  1862-1867: Díaz fought the French intervention February 1865: Captured by the French. 1866-67: Díaz escaped and rebuilt his army, 5/16/11 From Arms to Politics... And  1872: Juárez used governmental powers to insure his election over Díaz Porfirio revolted, crying fraud, but lost.  1872: Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada became president  Díaz: "sufragio efectivo, y no reelección."  When Lerdo "won" the election of 1876, Díaz issued the Plan de Tuxtepec calling for obedience to the constitution and "effective suffrage, no reelection," overthrew the government and declared himself 5/16/11 Cientificos and Positivism  Under Diaz, the philosophy of Positivism permeated the upper echelons of government.  Cientificos, as those who advocated the application of the scientific method to government became known, were influential. Most prominent were Treasury Minister Jose Yves Limantour and Manuel Romero Rubio, Diaz’ father-in- law.  Cientificos believed the nation's future lay with the upper classes and advocated a paternalistic attitude 5/16/11 Order in the Countryside  Díaz established a mounted rural police force ( rurales ) to control the rampant banditry. Many were former bandits recruited by pardons and good pay.  Rurales often killed outlaws and bandits “while attempting to escape” – the ley fuga .  Porfirio also sent the rurales after revolting peasants or striking miners. 5/16/11 Modernization and Foreign  More than any previous leader, Díaz projected an image of stability to foreign investors.  Foreign capital built Mexico's railway system, brought electricity and streetcars to the cities and larger towns, created modern port facilities, and developed mining and agricultural resources. 5/16/11...
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2011 for the course HIST 352 taught by Professor Drlentz during the Spring '11 term at University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

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