Brazil_-_abbreviated - From Empire to Republic 1807-1816...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
From Empire to Republic
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
1807-1816: Dom João VI ruled as regent. Opened Brazilian ports to British goods, eliminating Portuguese middlemen. Rio de Janeiro replaced Lisbon, placed the various captaincies in subservient positions.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Portugal was deeply indebted to the British. 1809: British saved the royal family and 15,000 courtiers and lent US $3 million. British liberated Portugal from Napoleon. 1815: Brazil raised to a kingdom equal with Portugal 1816: João VI crowned upon his mother’s death. Radical, republican revolts in Pernambuco, Paraíba do Norte, Rio Grande do Norte, and the south of Ceará undermined João VI’s authority.
Background image of page 4
Brazil experienced a rapid expansion of its cultural life and economy. Printing presses and an official newspaper were introduced in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Primary schools were modernized along with a school of fine arts, and medical schools in Bahia and Rio de Janeiro. A museum of natural history, a public library, and the Botanical Garden (above) in Rio de Janeiro were also built.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
September 1821: Portuguese Côrtes voted to abolish the Kingdom of Brazil and the royal agencies in Rio de Janeiro. January 1822: Pedro accepted petitions from Brazilian towns begging him to refuse the Côrtes' order to return to Lisbon. Dom Pedro "dismissed" the Portuguese commanding general and ordered him to remove his soldiers across the bay to await transport to Portugal. Pedro formed a new government headed by José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva of São Paulo.
Background image of page 6
Pedro called slavery a "cancer that is gnawing away at Brazil." He wanted to abolish slavery, but the liberal constitution gave the law- making authority to the slavocrat-controlled Parliament. Liberal principles were stripped of their revolutionary potential.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1820s: Bahia, Maranhão, and Pará, remained under Portuguese control. Pedro I relied on Admiral Thomas Alexander Cochrane, many of Cochrane’s officers, and French General Pierre Labatut to secure the provinces for Brazil. August 29, 1825: Britain and Portugal recognized Brazilian independence. 1828: Uruguay given independence as a buffer state despite Brazilian claims.
Background image of page 8
1826: After Dom João's death, Brazilian nativist radicals accused the emperor of plotting to overthrow the constitution to rule a reunited Brazil and Portugal. April 1831: Pedro dismissed his cabinet. Street and military demonstrators demanded its reinstatement in violation of his constitutional prerogatives. "I will do anything for the people but nothing [forced] by the people." 7 April 1831: Pedro abdicated in favor of his 5-year-old son Pedro II, boarded a British warship, and left Brazil as he had arrived, under the Union Jack.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1831-1840: Three regents ruled in Pedro I’s name. 1831-1832: Five uprisings
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 44

Brazil_-_abbreviated - From Empire to Republic 1807-1816...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online