Venezuela - Venezuela ClicktoeditMastersubtitlestyle

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  5/16/11 Venezuela From Miranda to the Caudillos
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 5/16/11 Post-Independence Caudillos:  Miranda to Paez Leaders of Venezuela’s  Independence – Francisco  Miranda (d. 1816) and Simon  Bolivar (d. 1830) – died in exile  after leading the critical early  stages of the struggle against  Spain. 1816-1819: José Antonio Páez, a  mestizo, had convinced  pardo  llaneros  along the Río Apure to  Simón Bolívar ( 1830)  by Antonio Maucci.  Suffering from “temible  tuberculosis”
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 5/16/11 Paez’ 16 Years of Prosperity 1830: New constitution; Páez  elected president under the  constitution Regional Revolts challenged his  rule. Páez oversaw the building of  the economic infrastructures Páez ruled in conjunction with  the criollo elite, which initially  benefited from high coffee 
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 5/16/11 Liberals  Ascendant 1846: General José  Tadeo Monagas, a  Liberal rival of Paez,  nominated by Paez to  lead Venezuela. Monagas ousted all the  Conservatives from his  Brothers José  Gregorio and José  TadeoMonagas share  rule as dictators. 1854: Abolition of  slavery  1857: New  constitution  represented an  attempt to establish a 
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 5/16/11 The Federal War and Factional  Fighting, 1858-1863 1858-1863: Liberal and conservative  caudillos fought the Federal War. The Federal War began 12 total years of  intermittent civil war. Liberals favored federalism, and named  General Juan C. Falcón president.  Caudillos ruled locally as they saw fit with  little intervention from the federal  government.
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 5/16/11 Antonio Guzmán Blanco 1870: Guzmán Blanco took  power and began an 18-year  dictatorship.    A distant relative of Bolivar, he  built up a national myth linking  the two men. Replaced rebellious  conservatives with liberal  regional caudillos in their place.  Guzmán Blanco used proceeds  from coffee exports to to 
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 5/16/11 The  "Civilizer"  Under Guzmán Blanco, advances were made in education  Guzmán Blanco founded a modern governmental bureaucracy,  and infrastructures for communications and transportation such  as roads, railroads, port facilities, and telegraph lines— These developments benefited export agriculture.  Caracas benefited from public works.  Guzmán, who liked to be referred to as the "Illustrious  American," dedicated as many of these projects to himself as 
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 5/16/11 High Point of the  “Illustrious American”  Guzmán Blanco's rule was  marked by uprisings against his  rule. His opponents resented his 
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2011 for the course HIST 352 taught by Professor Drlentz during the Spring '11 term at University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

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Venezuela - Venezuela ClicktoeditMastersubtitlestyle

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