3.3 Notes - To find a y-intercept, let x = 0 and solve for...

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3.3 Graphing Linear Functions By the vertical line test, we know that all linear equations are functions (except those  whose graphs are vertical lines). The equation y = 2x + 3 can be written as f(x) = 2x + 3 Any linear equation (except vertical lines) can be written using function notation: Solve equation for y Replace y with f(x) Example: Write the equation 2x + 3y = 6 using function notation. Another way to graph a linear equation or function is to find and plot the x- and y- intercepts. To find an x-intercept, let y = 0 or f(x) = 0 and solve for x.
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Unformatted text preview: To find a y-intercept, let x = 0 and solve for y. Example: Graph 2x + 3y = 6 by plotting intercepts. When a linear function is written in the form y = mx + b or f(x) = mx + b, the y-intercept is (0, b)! Example: What are the x- and y-intercepts of f(x) = 2x 4? Graphing Vertical and Horizontal Lines The graph of x = c is a vertical line with x-intercept (c, 0) The graph of y = c is a horizontal line with y-intercept (0, c) Examples: Graph x = -2 Graph y = 4...
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2011 for the course MTH 110 taught by Professor Helenius during the Spring '08 term at Grand Valley State University.

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3.3 Notes - To find a y-intercept, let x = 0 and solve for...

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