Lesson 2-1 - sides of the equation by the LCD(least common...

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Lesson 2.1 – Solving linear equations in one variable Perform operations necessary to get the variable by itself. Whatever you do to one side of the equation, you must also do to the other side of the equation! Example: 3x + 6 = 12 If the variable appears more than once in the equation, you will need to combine like terms first. Example: -2x + 2 – 4x = 20 If there are parentheses, you need to distribute first. Example: 4(x – 2) = 6x – 10 If an equation contains fractions, you can get rid of the fractions by multiplying both
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Unformatted text preview: sides of the equation by the LCD (least common denominator). Example: X – x = 1 6 8 8 If an equation contains decimals, multiply both sides by a multiple of ten to get rid of the decimals. Example: 0.2x + 0.1 = 0.12x – 0.06 Some equations have no solution, and some have all real numbers as solutions. Examples: 5x – 1 = 5(x + 3)-4(x – 1) = -4x – 9 + 13...
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This note was uploaded on 05/13/2011 for the course MTH 110 taught by Professor Helenius during the Spring '08 term at Grand Valley State.

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Lesson 2-1 - sides of the equation by the LCD(least common...

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