THOMAS COLE

THOMAS COLE - Forest is church. THOMAS COLE-Hudson river...

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THOMAS COLE AND ROMANTIC LANDSCAPE William Wordsworth James Fenimore Cooper William Cullen Bryant Asher B. Durand, Kindred Spirits 1849 Thomas Cole, The Course of Empire 1836 1801-1848 The Savage State –beginning, similar to native Americans The Pastoral State –Like ancient Greece and Rome, birth of math, crafts, music, etc. Consummation of Empire –large empire. No nature. Destruction Desolation- ruins Extra Points: Peak of new nation. Love of landscape and nature. National parks. Romanticism-feelings are important, individual genius, Romantics are interested in how outside world affects subjectivity of individual. Nature related to a larger moral system, when humans interact they become better people. Spiritual uplift from nature. James Fenimore Cooper-leatherstocking romances-ie Last of the Mohicans. Adventure, nature, Euro Americans, Indians etc. William Cullen Bryan-a forest Hymn-spiritual value of forest.
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Unformatted text preview: Forest is church. THOMAS COLE-Hudson river school of art. From England, lived in backwoods of Penn. Found way to NYC. Trumbull(found Cole), William Cullen Bryan, and Cooper formed Hudson River School Cole-essay on American Scenery- Coles painting show emotion. Does this by contrast. Painting pulls you in to story. The Oxbow-Half dense forest, half cultivated. Frontier moving west. Artist in the middle holding It all together. Schroon Mountian-native American camouflaged, also shows that God love America, uses autumn colors. Frederick Church(coles pupil), Twilight in the wilderness, 1860. Pastoral State-everything in harmony. Consummation of Empire-noon. Warning Destruction- Fall of Roman empire, Late afternoon Desolation-nature coming back....
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This note was uploaded on 05/15/2011 for the course AMST 101 taught by Professor Kasson during the Spring '09 term at UNC.

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