Poli. 100 Notes 3

Poli 100 Notes 3 - Prisoner’s Dilemma Dominant Strategy – The strategy that is better for one player no matter what the opponent does When each

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Civil Rights African Americans Plessy v. Ferguson (Separate but equal) Missouri ex rel Gaines v. Canada (Must be available in the state) Sweatt v. Painter (Must be equal) Brown v. Board of education of Topeka (Separate inherently inequal) Swann v. CMS (Busing appropriate remedy for unequal distribution of students) Affirmative Action Regents of California v. Bakke (1978) Affirmative action ok, but not quotas Privacy – Reproductive Control Big steps in favor of more individual control Grisswald v. Connecticut Right to contraception via marital privacy
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Unformatted text preview: Prisoner’s Dilemma Dominant Strategy – The strategy that is better for one player, no matter what the opponent does. When each player plays the dominant strategy, and have no incentive to change their strategy, that means there is a Nash equilibrium Pareto Optimality – Best joint outcome for the two parties Nash Equilibrium – You have no incentive to change your choice, because if the opponent responds, you will be hurt by the response...
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This note was uploaded on 05/16/2011 for the course POLI 100 taught by Professor Rabinowitz during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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