Postcolonial Sovereignty and the Problem of Autocracy

Postcolonial Sovereignty and the Problem of Autocracy -...

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Postcolonial Sovereignty and the Problem of Autocracy Orientation Postcolonial leaders were concerned about sovereignty (political and economic autonomy from the West). Reality: context of the Cold War created continuity and new forms of dependence o International organizations: World Bank, IMF o Socialist option: USSR, China Intellectuals and leaders recognized these new problems o Fanon cited class tensions internal to nation-states o Nkrumah warned of neo-colonialism o Nyerere established a form of African socialism (ujamaa) Attempts at new forms of political community among postcolonial countries o Bandung meeting o Political, cultural, and economic exchange between Africa and Asia Summary: Decolonization did not lead to political autonomy and popular democracy as once imagined by anti-colonial nationalist groups. I. The Problem of the “Gatekeeper” State (Cooper) a. Key problem: postcolonial leaders inherited colonial state infrastructure that was centralized i. Institutional continuity: Crawford Young
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This note was uploaded on 05/16/2011 for the course HIST 130 taught by Professor Lindsay during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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Postcolonial Sovereignty and the Problem of Autocracy -...

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