Lecture 8 jan29 no qwiz - Lecture 8 Capacitors and...

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Lecture 8 Capacitors and Capacitance Exam info on ctools
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Capacitor defined: Any 2 conductors with equal but opposite charges. Fine print: 1. One conductor can be replaced with ∞ 2. We could charge conductors with non-equal charges, but we require +Q and -Q→ use a battery to transfer charge 3. Might have an insulator/dielectric in between (more later) DEMO
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A typical design consists of a top electrode connected by some means (usually a chain) to the inner surface of the jar and an external conducting foil wrapping. The inner and outer surfaces of the jar store equal but opposite charge. The original form of the device was a glass jar coated on the outside with metal foil and containing (accidentally) impure water that acted as a conductor, connected by a chain or wire to an external sphere. It was initially believed that the charge was stored in the water. Benjamin Franklin investigated the Leyden jar, and concluded that the charge was stored in the glass, not in the water, as others had assumed. We now know that the charge is actually
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Lecture 8 jan29 no qwiz - Lecture 8 Capacitors and...

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