Principles_of_academic_summary

Principles_of_academic_summary - stop using students SAT...

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SLCC, Dr. Zerwin, Fairview High School Principles of academic summary: 1) Summarize key ideas as opposed to specific events. 2) State the name of the author and the title of his/her article/book, etc., early in your summary. 3) Use author tags throughout to clearly establish that you are referring to the author’s ideas (as opposed to advancing your own ideas). Example: “McCarthy suggests that…” or “Botstein argues that…” or “According to Ehrenreich,…” 4) Remain objective throughout your summary. 5) Put the summary into your own words, except when you… (see #6) 6) Use brief quotes where appropriate (a well-stated phrase that refers to the text’s main point, key words or phrases that you might refer to frequently, etc.) Sample summary: In his essay, “Dropping the SAT?”, which is posted on the Affirmative Action and Diversity Project’s Website, George Will considers the proposal by some that schools
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Unformatted text preview: stop using students SAT scores when choosing which students to admit. Mr. Will explains that at most prominent schools in America, the SAT is a key factor in determining college admissions. Mr. Will argues that the SAT is an important tool in predicting the ability of prospective students to perform in college and therefore, should continue to be a factor in college admissions. As part of his argument, Mr. Will discusses the origins of the SAT, considers the SATs effect on campus diversity, challenges the validity of some of the common arguments against using the SAT test, and explains why he believes the SAT to be a necessary tool in determining college admissions. Mr. Will concludes that the SAT is still necessary because we need some generally accepted means of making millions of annual assessments roughly predictive of ability to perform well in particular colleges....
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