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Beloved Passage Analysis Assignment

Beloved Passage Analysis Assignment - i PASSAGE ANALYsis E...

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Unformatted text preview: i PASSAGE ANALYsis E Choose one quotation from the list provided, type it 111 tripie space and analyze it in the following areas: I; GRAMMAR (as. points} 3 i’assa'ge Labeling ‘ E Number your sentences Label the major piarts of each sentence including. subject predicate obiect, and any . modifiers / modifying phrases /ciauses Chart Make a chart reflecting the following information about each sentence: Sentence number SentenceiSmnmary . sentence! [length {number of words) Type of sentence beginning (subject adverb phrase/ciauseetype etc. } Number gof Phrases _ Number {of Clauses Sentencei type (compound, complex compound/compiexh or sinip'ie) Syntax Paragraph 'i ._ - Write a paragraph about the data' in your chart. Do you notice any patterns? it so, what are they? If the apthor 3 syntax and grammatical style seem. to have a noticeable effect on the tone of the passage or if they seem to reflect other aspects of— the passage, comment on that as Well Refrain from flattering the authorWStick to observation and analysis seseeee ' CONTENT (80 points) Perform a close reaching of the passage. Read through severai times looking: for notable elements. Underline! and label key words / phrases / symbols/ images. Then compose a paragraph for each oi? the following: - 1. Context and Summary {WI-IA???) 333. Describe the time and place of the passage in the nevei “E Literally paraphrase each sentence to clearly summarize the content. II Wrap up the sentence with a hint of what is to come next 2. Style (HOW?) You will write two paragraphs The first paragraph w'iii be about the author’ s TONE Baseci on your passage and its notable features choose one of the following areas to concentrate your second paragraph upon Tone / It Looking over key WOrd choice of the author, identify his / her tone (use Tone Vocabulary sheet as reference) we Ii Discuss the specific words that contribute to me tone, inciuding , 3 specific words’ denotation as well as connotation Imagery _ ' ’ Look Over the passage to identify key images Can you identify that these images fit into a specific category (1. e.- nature images, mechanical images) or fit into a specific type of . imagery (gustatory, auditory, etc.) 1: Does the' imagery support or contrast With the content of the ; i 3 passage? (re. do they assist in making the ideas of the work seem convincing or do they undercut the content) What is the effect? Symboiism "3 Look over the passage to see if you can identify a symbol (be careful don t try to make something a symbol that isn’t one?) .1 Identify the meaning of a major symboi 1n the passage and what does it represent? How does the author’ s use of symbolism provide for the reader a deeper understanding of the work’s significance? .. _.__W a... I i 1IThematic Significance 8 Discuss the sigruficance of the paSSage as it relates to the novel as a ' Whole ' ‘1 isolate Specifically Which elements of the passage'relate to a speCific I thematic message of the novel. Tips on Writing your 9' aragraphs: Generalz. 1 ' 'w‘I Be sure to have a clear topic sentence and clincher for each paragraph. 5 Have Ia clear and engaging title. ' a - Be IcOncise .don- t pad ybfir paragraphs with filler Words 9 Read through the passage several times before you start, then mark the passage noting stylrStic, thematic and grammatical etei‘nen‘ts. a Watch for repetition of words or images. this can often be the author’ 5 SiUn'al to you of somethings importance. ' Context and Summary _ Be sure you begin with ttie context then aimost sentence by sentence summarize the passage, then conclude with a hint at What comes next, if applicabte. Tone Here, the best approach' is to highlight key words and look for a pattern 15 there repetition of a word? Is there a simiiarity' In the words chosen? ReVieW your tone achectives. I For example if the folloWing Words were highlighted m a passage What WIouid you say the tone Was: forlorn, desolate, wandered, scratched. howling, bedraggled lNhat about:- giggled, skipped, warm, suniight, hopscotCh, clapping ' You might also took for atone shift. Sometimes authors shift their word Choice to reveal their attitude about a character or event This IS pretty significant when it happens Try to examine why. Other Literag; Device gimagegy or Sm bolismgi Choose the device that is Ideminant throughout your passage. That Way you Will have plenty to discuss. If writing about' 1magery,_ look at What type of imagery (olfactory, visual, auditory, tactite, or gustatory). if your passage has a symbol, discuss Whether this fits into a pattern of symbolism thrdughout the rest of the book Discuss the effect Of the imagery or symbolism. Si 513' ificance Here you ask the question SO WHAT? The author, using plot, word choice, and a variety of stylistic / literary elements has crafted a story that leaves you with a universal message. Avoid over generalization like ”life 13 hard" or you ve got to have friends " Also tryI to use phrases like “the individual” rather tlian” on.u ” Avoid personal pronouns. r i l ~_.- 1 Passage Analysis Gramrhar and Syntax Models Nnmber Sentence Beginning Sentence Number Sentence Type 1 Pohrases Daisys ‘ I ‘ i __ . - ’ Complex art1f1c1al W611 _ Saxophones 1 Complex play as people - Rooms are full of driftm“ faces ‘3' g . Em Daisy was youn- ' ' her artificial World was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful ass-Ce . 3 or snobbery and orchés J I 61111 1 year 511111111111 up the sadness and ”Beale Street Blue 1” ' A (11183 fit the greyA has 11131: I‘lhere . 15*: AN ' 1 ground the floor ”(158)”. Syjntax: Borne Back into the Past Fitzgerald’s syntax has several notable feamres that run throughout this passage that help support the overali content First there are a sigmficant number of r'ep'ositional and parlticipial Ehrases that predominantly act as adjectives modifying Daisy’s sf’artificial" World In a 0 there are several adjectiVe clauses that again layer 111 descriptions of the world' in which Daisy has lived all her life” '1 e 5 appear frequently after the words they modify sending the reader baCkWards" to tea 111g through the pa "e Wlfich might act to reinforce the fact that this passage is a memory of Gatsby and his nnpresszon of the world 111 which Daisy lived when he fell in low: with her Additionally, all the dela introducing the sirbmct instead beginning with some form of an adVerb: either alone as in sentence 2, as a phrase in s ence 3 or as an entire clause in sentence one. This structure propels the reader forward seeking not only the subject of the sentence but also the predicate that the adverb 1s modifying The verbs are often state of being verbs that are highly modified as well perhaps reinforcing the idea that these pedple are in a sort of stasis with movement all around them. Finally, the complex structure of all the sentences might suggest the View of Gatsby of a World he cannot fully comprehend yet is desperate to be a part of. Context and Summary: An Artificial World .F. Scott Fitzgerald 5 novel The Great Gatsby IS striking 111 its commentary 011' class 111 -America.' This passage from page 158' explores that motif through its depiction of Daisy as described by Gatsby, the man who has sought after this elusive entry into the Wealthy. Upper . class all his. life. The passage comes sitter Gatsby has beeh-re1ected by'Da1sy and after Daisy has inadvertently killed her husband’s mistress While drivmg Gatsby a (:21: Here Gatsby: IS describihg, finally, his trite past to Nick Carr-away, the narrattJr Nick 15 describing Daisy s 'World, the World Gatsby '50 desperately wants to be a part of Yet the description of the Werlds” is one that is “artific-1a ” and full of ”pleasant, cheerful snobbery. ” Here the Well-terdo shuffle to the music of African Americans, the blues,wl1ile blissfully unaware of any hlues themselves They drink tea and are described as ”fresh faces" blown like ”rose petals" scattered here and there. This time in Daisy 3 life' 13' a dividing line Where she decides" to man-11m arid abandon IGatSby and this depictlon Of her life leaves the reader Wondering What on earth Was so attractive about this life 11-1 the first place' l' Tone: Hopele'ssriess of Pleasant-rise . Fitzerald s {7011a in this passage is mildly critical of this “artificial world? of his main character, ' Daisy Fay. While there are Words with positive connotatimis such as, "pleasant” “golden“, ”silver", ”fresh”, “yoiIng’, arid ”sweet”, he counters these words With words with clear negative " connotations such as artifimal”, ”sadness”, "suggestiveness" ‘I’Ihopeless”, "grey” and. "sad" The balance tips tOWarclslthe negative iericllhg the pas ‘ reader can see the 1 egative side of this kind of a . IIII this balanced negative/positive word choice This is shoWh p larly when uses two opposing words back to back as in ”cheerful snobbery arid “shining ddst"~—a‘n this World even the dust on the floors. shiries. Ultimately, Fitzgerald sh'oWs perhaps the tempering voices of lgotli' Gatsby, Who undoubtedly described the imagined scene to Nick, and Nick’s pernt of VieW of this World he has come to understand arid dislike. The tone of the passage helps to underscore this empathetic criticism. Imagery: Colors and FloWers Fitzgerald’s novel. The Great Gatsby' is redolent With both color and flower Imagery and this passage is no exCeption. Here this upper class world is compared to an ”orchid" a flower that associated with beauty. But the people' in this world also resemble ”rose petals blown Iby the sad horns around the floor." jThe rose is a symbol of love, bit that love IS symbolically dispersed 111 this world that favors formality and convention over true emotion. This passage. further uses colors to depict the qualities of this life: gold and silver are dead to describe the shdfflmg siippers of these people but then the color grey is iritroduced perhaps to cast a pail over. the sheen of these colors associated with Wealth and shiny metals. Fitzgerald uses this second layer of' unagery to reinforce his overall message about wealth in America and its inextn'cable hold over the imaginations of its lower classes. ‘ l i ...
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