Working with Poetry Forms directions

Working with Poetry Forms directions - Working with Poetry...

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Working with Poetry Forms AS you’ll recall, your poetry portfolio requires you to write at least 1 of your 5 original poems in a structured form. At this station, you will practice doing exactly that. You see in front of you the rules for writing a Shakespearean Sonnet, a villanelle, a haiku, a sestina, and a rondeau. Take a couple minutes to look at the rules for each form so that you are familiar with them. (These rules will be available online for you to look at later, by the way.). After you’ve looked at each one, choose one form to practice at this station (If you choose haiku you will need to write at least 2.) You will have 10 minutes to write your poem. Have fun! The purpose of this activity is to give you practice working with a set structure for poetry and having to bend your ideas to fit within a certain set of rules.
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Shakespearean Sonnet  Must consist of 14 lines.  Generally, it is written in iambic pentameter (10 syllables  alternating between unstressed and stressed), but you don’t need to  do that for this activity. You should try to write in iambic  pentameter if you choose this form for your poetry portfolio,  though.  It should follow a basic rhyme scheme, usually: a b a b c d c d e f e f g g  The first quatrain (4-line stanza) introduces the theme or idea.  The second quatrain provides more information or detail about  the theme or idea  The third quatrain introduces a conflict or twist (This is  called a “Peripeteia” which means a sudden reversal of fortune or  change in circumstance) Shakespeare usually uses the word “But” to  show this turn of events.  The fourth part is a couplet (a rhymed 2-line stanza) That  summarizes the piece and leaves the reader with a new, concluding  image. Here’s an example: Sonnet 18 By William Shakespeare Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
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Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade
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Working with Poetry Forms directions - Working with Poetry...

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