Day 09- Jan 20, 21 - LA11: American Literature and...

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Unformatted text preview: LA11: American Literature and Composition Block day, January 20th, 21st 2010 Block Day, January 20th, st 21 Today's Objectives: Students will demonstrate understanding of historical context and the women writers they have studied up to this point in the unit. Students will understand how to explicate a poem, and practice doing so on their own, using examples as models. Students will lead the class through a poem explication to demonstrate speaking skills as well as an understanding of poetry explication and literary devices. Block Day, January 20th, st 21 Today's Agenda Quiz: Women Writers Parts 13 Poetry Explication Notes/PowerPoint Dickinson Poetry Explication Break Emily Dickinson Poetry Jigsaw Poetry Discussion Studentled Note to Absent Students: Take notes on the poetry explication process (included in this PowerPoint) Complete a poetry explication on the two Dickenson Poems you signed up for. Turn in your poetry explications upon your return. Poetry Explication Analyzing poetry for theme Explication for theme and meaning Preparing to write the explication Read the poem silently, then read it aloud (if not in a testing situation). Repeat as necessary. Determine the topic and the overall message What does the poet most want the audience to ponder Identify and describe the tone of voice, the conflicts or ideas, the language and the poetic devices used in the poem. It helps to know the author background (what literary movements are present at the time? Who/What are his/her influences? What is the historical context in which he/she is writing? etc.) http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/poetry-explication.html#1 Poetic Devices (a partial Personification list) Imagery Alliteration Metaphor Simile Assonance Consonance Dissonance Symbolism Parallelism Hyperbole Irony Sarcasm Free Verse Rhyme (rhyme scheme) would you know my name if i saw you in heaven would it be the same if i saw you in heaven i must be strong and carry on 'cause i know i don't belong here in heaven would you hold my hand if i saw you in heaven would you help me stand if i saw you in heaven i'll find my way through night and day cause i know i just can't stay here in heaven beyond the door there's peace i'm sure but i know there'll be no more tears in heaven a b a b c c c b d b d b e e e f f f b time can bring you down time can bend your knees time can break your heart have you beggin' please beggin' please would you know my name if i saw you in heaven would it be the same if i saw you in heaven beyond the door there's peace i'm sure but i know there'll be no more tears in heaven By Eric Clapton g h i b h a b a b f f f b William Carlos Williams In the flashes and black shadows of July the days, locked in each other's arms, seem still so that Squirrels and colored birds go about at ease over the branches and through the air. Where will a shoulder split or a forehead open and victory be? Nowhere. Both sides grow older. And you may be sure not one leaf will lift itself from the ground and become fast to a twig again. The Hunter The Hunter William Carlos Williams In the flashes and black shadows of July the days, locked in each other's arms, seem still so that Squirrels and colored birds go about at ease over the branches and through the air. Where will a shoulder split or a forehead open and victory be? Nowhere. Both sides grow older. And you may be sure not one leaf will lift itself from the ground and become fast to a twig again. Assonance Metaphor/ personification Alliteration Consonance Imagery Assonance Dissonance Consonance Dissonance Primal sound The day is itself alive and active Grace of movement Look there! and see it-expectancy Calm now Now hear this and get this through your heads! I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox This is Just to Say Explication Says "I'm sorry" but doesn't sound sorrysarcasm Rhyme Scheme: Free Verse-Like a note written any day Shows how everyday language can be poetic. Seems humorous Parallel use of "so" makes it more descriptive Consonance- natural speech Assonance-Alliteration in the rationale to make the plea for forgiveness smooth and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold William Carlos Williams Your Turn: Now you will complete a 3column poetry explication on the two Emily Dickinson Poems you chose. You need your own sheet of paper. Set it up in 3 columns this means you will be copying the poem. Complete the Poetry Explication for your two poems. Group Meeting: Same Poems Find someone (or a couple people) who explicated the same poems as you (this may mean you need two meetings). Compare your explications. Did your group members get something you did not? Make additions and changes based on your discussion. Teacher Role: You will teach a Lesson in Explication: Now you will take the role of teacher. You will lead a small group through the explication of your poem. Explain your process Explain your elements Discuss what you think this means about an overall theme or message about the piece. You only have 5 minutes so be precise!! Student Role: you will take notes and evaluate your teacher. As your "teacher" presents, take notes so you can ask questions at the end. After the teaching period, evaluate your teacher. Write your "teacher's" real name. Write your code name. Please take these evaluations seriously they help identify what you and your "teacher" need to work on. Block Day, January 20th, st 21 Homework for tonight: Complete the Graphic Organizer for your 2 Emily Dickinson Poems. Finish Explicating your (2) Dickinson poems. On Deck for Friday: Dickinson Jigsaw Teach Explication Lessons ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/16/2011 for the course WRT 114 taught by Professor Cullen during the Fall '09 term at Grand Valley State University.

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