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uncch102L_exp10

uncch102L_exp10 - Experiment 10 Gas Laws Spring 2010 I HAVE...

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Experiment 10 – Gas Laws Spring 2010 I HAVE USED THIS LAB! IF YOU TURN THIS IN YOU WILL BE CAUGHT! Point Summary (See Blackboard for detailed grading rubric) Superior Excellent Satisfactory Fair Poor Omitted Introduction •Purpose of Report •Goals of Experiment Materials and Methods Results and Discussion •Description of data •Data Tables •Data Table Titles •Graphs •Figure Captions •Sample Calculations •Systematic Error •Random Error Discussion of discrepancies Other Lab Technique TOTAL POINTS TA Comments/Suggestions:
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C HEMISTRY 102L R EPORT T EMPLATE EXPT. Experimenting with Gas Laws 10 10 Introduction In this lab, we are examining the Ideal Gas Law and specifically the relationships between pressure, temperature, volume of a confined gas. Boyle’s Law helps us to investigate the relationships between pressure and volume, and Gay-Lussac’s Law helps us with the relationship between the pressure and the temperature. While conducting our experiment we gathered data on the pressure, temperature and volume and then used our knowledge of the Gas Law’s to interpret that data. Our goals were to determine the Gas constant (R) and to determine the absolute zero for our data, and compare them to the known values of R (0.08206 l*atm/K*mol) and absolute zero (-273ºC). To find these values two experiments were conducted to collect data on the pressure as the volume and the temperature were changed. To collect data pertaining to pressure and temperature, a syringe was set at 5 mL for the initial pressure reading. Then every 15 seconds the pressure was increased up to 20 mL, and a pressure was taken each time the volume increased 1 mL. Collecting data relating pressure and temperature was preformed after heating an Erlenmeyer flask to a temperature above 333K in a hot bath. After the goal temperature was reached the flask was removed from the hot bath and allowed to cool. A temperature reading was taken for every 0.005 K decrease in temperature. All data was recorded in DataStudio. After the data was collected it was put into 5 graphical figures. The linear regression equations of the two graphs and knowledge of the Ideal Gas Law were then used to find the values of R and absolute zero. The importance of this experiment is to further our knowledge of the gas laws and to use them in an experimental setting. Materials and Methods The procedure for this experiment was taken from the UNC CHEM-102L Lab Manual. The lab manual was followed except for two deviations. During the first part of this experiment, a few extra trials were started to practice obtaining data in DataStudio, but were then erased. Also, the second part of the experiment calls for at least 8 data points taken, 11 data points were collected in the first run and 10 were collected in the second run.
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Results and Discussion The data presented in Table 1 represents data collected in the first part of the experiment and was used to examine the relationship between pressure and volume as described by Boyle’s Law. The
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