Examples - Lesson 1: Coulomb's Law What is it? A Van de...

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Lesson 1: Coulomb’s Law What is it? A Van de Graaff generator is an electrostatic generator which uses a moving belt to accumulate very high electrostatically stable voltages on a hollow metal globe on the top of the stand. Invented in 1929 by American physicist Robert J. Van de Graaff, the potential differences achieved in modern Van de Graaff generators can reach 5 megavolts. The Van de Graaff generator can be thought of as a constant-current source connected in parallel with a capacitor and a very large electrical resistance. A Van de Graaff generator is a charged hollow conductor, usually a sphere, which can develop a potential difference up to millions of volts. It is used to generate static electricity. Robert J. Van de Graaff invented this type of generator in 1929. He used the fact that the charge for a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium resides on the surface and the fact that a charged conductor placed inside a hollow conductor will have all its charge transferred to the hollow one. History
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This note was uploaded on 05/15/2011 for the course ECON 103 taught by Professor Miyzaki during the Spring '11 term at Brown College.

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Examples - Lesson 1: Coulomb's Law What is it? A Van de...

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