Wilson case

Wilson case - In Wilson v Southwest Airlines Company case a...

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In Wilson v. Southwest Airlines Company case, a male sued the airline after he was not hired as a flight attendant, because he was male. Southwest argued that allowing only females to be flight attendants was a BFOQ. The airline claimed that maintenance of its female-only hiring policy is crucial to be financially successful. Bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) is legalized discrimination, and available only on rare occasions, when the employer is able to prove that the ground for choosing one group over another goes to the essence of what employer is in business to do. BFOQ test include two steps: (1) does the job require that the employee be of the one gender only, (2) is that requirement reasonably necessary to the “essence” of the employer business. In Southwest’s case, primary marketing goal of the company was to maintain “sexy” image of their airline by hiring attractive females and dressing them in high boots and hot-pants. It really has nothing to do with the
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Wilson case - In Wilson v Southwest Airlines Company case a...

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