math dq2 - The value is a solution to the equation if,...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How do you know if a value is a solution for an inequality? How is this different from determining if a value is a solution to an equation? If you replace the equal sign of an equation with an inequality sign, is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and the inequality? Solution The value is a solution to the equality if, substituting that value in the equation, satiefies the inequality. Example – If x + 2 <5 , Then if the solution is x = -6, then that means that substituting -6 in the equation gives -6+2 = -4 which is less than 5 , so the value satisfies the inequality.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The value is a solution to the equation if, substituting that value in the equation, satisfies the equation. Example If x + 2 = 5 , Then if the solution is x = 3, then that means that substituting -3 in the equation gives 3+2 = 5 which equal to right hand side, 5 , so the value satisfies the equation. If the equal sign is replaces by inequality, then the chance of same value satisfying both inequality and equation occurs only when the inequality reads as less than equal ( ) or more than equal ()...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 05/16/2011 for the course MAT 116 taught by Professor Universityofphoenix during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online