235_pdfsam_VLSI TEST PRINCIPLES & ARCHITECTURES

235_pdfsam_VLSI TEST PRINCIPLES & ARCHITECTURES -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 204 VLSI Test Principles and Architectures line assignments b = b = 1 and c = c = 1 as b = b = 1 c = and c = c = 1 a = 1 b = 1 , respectively. Note that there exist other sets of impossible value combinations not covered by any of these three single-line conflicts. Not all remaining conflicting combinations are nontrivial. For example, consider the conflicting scenario a = c = 1 . This is a trivial value conflict because a = → c = and c = 1 → a = 1 . There- fore, a = c = 1 is already covered by the single-line conflicts a = a = 1 and c = c = 1 . There exists a conflicting assignment that is not covered by any single-line conflicts: a = 1 b = 1 c = 0 . In order to compute the corresponding impossible value assignment set, it is necessary to compute the following implications: impl a = impl b = 0 , and impl c = 1 . By traversing the implication edges in the graph, the impossible value assignment set a = b = c = c = 1 a = 1 b = 1 is obtained. This set has not been covered in any of the previous impossible valueobtained....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online