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MAN3025ManagementTheoryPart1Fall2009Lecture3

MAN3025ManagementTheoryPart1Fall2009Lecture3 - Part 1 The...

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Part 1. The Science of Management: Two Main Perspectives (today) Historical Contemporary Part 2. The Learning Organization (next time)
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Two Main Perspectives Historical Classical Behavioral Quantitative Contemporary Systems Contingency Quality-Management The Learning Organization (next time)
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1890 1940 1990s Classical
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Pre-/Scientific Management (Scientific study of work methods.) Administrative Theory (Managing the total organization.)
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Presentation on “The Engineer as Economist” (Considered by many as the starting point for modern management thought. He is not in your textbook.) Stressed importance of management as a field of independent study. President of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in 1889 Excerpt from “Industrial Engineering” FYI. Henry Towne (1844-1924). For, “Industrial Engineering,” an address delivered by Henry R. Towne, M.E. at Purdue University Friday, February 24th, 1905 go to: http:// www.cslib.org/stamford/towne1905.htm.
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Influenced by Henry Towne (President of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) from 1906-1907) Development of a true science of management I will read an excerpt from the Introduction of “The Principles of Scientific Management (1911)” (p. 5) Main Contributions: Soldiering & Principles of Scientific Management FYI. Fredrick W. Taylor (1856-1915). For a copy of “Principles of Scientific Management” go to: http:// wissensnavigator.ch/documents/ TaylorScientificManagement.pdf . For the Stevens Institute Archives (documents from/to/or about Taylor): http://stevens.cdmhost.com/cdm4/browse.php? CISOROOT=/p4100coll1 .
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Increase in output of each man would result in “throwing a large number of men out of work.” (Influence of labor unions.) Defective systems of management make it necessary for workers to soldier to protect their own self interest. (What would an energetic worker, who receives the same pay as a lazy worker, eventually do? Systematic soldiering. (Ford Motor Company’s 5-dollar a day Profit- Sharing Plan; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4KrIMZpwCY&feature=related ) Inefficient “rule of thumb” methods are in place that waste effort
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The Story of Schmidt (p. 43) Scientific Selection: Ability-Load 47 tons of Pig-Iron a day; Motivation-Motivation to work harder (currently earned $1.15/day; eager to work harder because a “penny looks about the size of a cartwheel to him” p. 44 Called him “Schmidt”…he is actually Henry Noll (or Knolle) Asked him if he wants to earn $1.85/day, but he
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