Hon 190 Impromptu Final Study Guide Final Exam 5 10 11

Hon 190 Impromptu Final Study Guide Final Exam 5 10 11 -...

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Hon 190 Impromptu Final Study Guide (Only put down the main points on the notecard, it is impossible to memorize notes and speech in 3 minutes. In speech, elaborate on the main points and questions, also show impromptu skills.) 1. Discuss the Greek sophist’s influences on the study of rhetoric. This may include what sophists did, highlight a few of the most important sophists, as well as what they were criticized for. The Sophists, also known as the first leaders of rhetoric, were nomadic teachers who made profit by teaching others how to speak well and make weak arguments stronger. Many people criticized them to be distrustful. One of the most important sophists, Gorges understood the relationship of speaker and audience as linear, whereby a speaker fills the audience with knowledge, or moves them to action. Language and words, according to Gorgias accomplished things by encouraging human emotions. According to the textbook and handout Public Speaking A Long Tradition, he used his language to entrance, and which many of his critics condemned him for. Another important sophist was Protagoras who taught a different understanding of rhetoric and public speaking to his students. For Protagoras, anything and everything could be argued. He taught his students see both sides of an argument. He asked his students to come with arguments for and against the same issue so they could better analyze which was stronger and, thus more accurate. His critics, however, said that this approach merely instructed people to make the worse case look better in an effort win the debate. Also, according to the handout Public Speaking, A Long Tradition critics claimed his approaches to go against morals. Another important sophist was Isocrates , who created the first school of rhetoric in Athens. According to the textbook and handout, Public Speaking A Long Tradition, Isocrates was an Athenian citizen unlike the other Sophists. In his school, he charged quite a bit in terms of tuition, and even had very rigorous entrance requirements, accepting only the best and brightest students of Athens. Essentially, Isocrates felt that good speakers were well-learned on a variety of subjects, and believed that to expect to know the right course of action in every situation was impossible. He also felt that education on many subjects was the best way to ensure ethical goals for a speaker. His critics later claimed that he did not have a set of rules and characteristics of a well put together speech like some of his contemporaries. In the end he believed, one had to be educated, have a natural ability to speak, and must have experience to be a great public speaker.
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2. Discuss Plato’s most important dialogues. This may include what dialectic is, as well as the important aspects of Gorgias, Phaedrus, and the Republic. (2 min - extend) According to the textbook and handout The Classical Heritage of Rhetoric, dialectic is a way to arrive to the truth, and by asking questions. It was later referred to as the Socratic method,
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Hon 190 Impromptu Final Study Guide Final Exam 5 10 11 -...

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