M_W_Chapter_20.1_Early_Paleozoic_North_America_short

M_W_Chapter_20.1_Early_Paleozoic_North_America_short -...

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Early Paleozoic North America What was happening? Chapter 20-A
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Tectonic events A large “Supercontinent” (Rodinia) had assembled by late in the Proterozoic. It started to break apart about 600 Ma. Australia and Antarctica split away from the West Coast to open up the Pacific (Panthalassic Ocean). Europe and South America (!) split away from the East Coast to form an Atlantic-precursor ocean called Iapetus Several fragments from Rodinia fused together to form Africa
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The Early Paleozoic Passive continental margins all around North America
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Passive margins, sediment being shed into the seas all around North America.
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? Cyanobacterium from Burgess Shale, suggesting that original habitat was very shallo water (photic zone, one or two meters deep) Sedimentary structures in the shale include graded beds, suggesting deposition by periodic fine-grained, low density turbidity currents, bringing in fauna (and other organisms) from shallower water. These are the Burgess organisms that we would know about from normally preserved hard-part fossils Soft parts preservation gives us a glimpse of a more complete population.
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Rose and fell periodically during the Phanerozoic, with major transgressions and regressions , dividing the strata into natural depositional sequences , separated by unconformities . The effects of this were most obvious in
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2011 for the course GEOL 106 taught by Professor Richter during the Spring '08 term at University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

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M_W_Chapter_20.1_Early_Paleozoic_North_America_short -...

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