book terms - Modern Linguistics: Morphology Second Edition...

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Modern Linguistics: Morphology Second Edition Francis Katamba and John Stonham LING 1773 Term Definition Example Part I Background Chapter One morphology the study of the internal structure of words synchronic discipline a discipline focusing on the study of word-structure at one stage in the life of a language rather than on the evolution of words linguistic level a single dimension of language structure semantic level (deals with meaning) ^ syntactic level (deals with sentence-structure) ^ morphological level (deals with word- structure) ^ phonology (or phonemics) (deals with sound systems) doctrine of separation of levels it was considered theoretically reprehensible to make use of information from a higher level syntax, when analyzing a lower level such as phonology phoneme a sound that distinguishes word meaning in a particular language /p/ and /f/ are phonemes of English; they distinguish pin /pin/ from fin /fin/ morpheme an abstract entity that expresses a single concept within a word generative grammar a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description lexicon a store of information about lexical items, whether printed or 1
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Modern Linguistics: Morphology Second Edition Francis Katamba and John Stonham LING 1773 mental recursive a rule which can apply again and again is said to be recursive the rule that introduces prepositional phrases in this sentence is recursive: I know the girl standing near the stout man with a scrawny dog with a bald patch on its back . module an individual linguistic level syntax, phonology, semantics grammar and rule of grammar First, in generative linguistics, refers to the implicit, totally unarticulated knowledge of rules and principles of their language that people have in their heads. Second, covers not only morphology and syntax but also semantics, the lexicon and phonology. Third, may refer to a book containing a statement of the rules and principles inferred by linguists to lie behind the linguistic behavior of speakers of a particular language. Lastly, some grammars are books containing prescriptive statements, rules that prescribe certain kinds of usage competence a person’s implicit knowledge of the rules of a language that makes the production and understanding of an indefinitely large number of new utterances possible performance the actual use of language in real situations innate Chomsky contends that the linguistic capacity of humans is innate, or built into the brain language faculty Chomsky believes the innate linguistic capacity is housed in this language faculty and it is 2
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Modern Linguistics: Morphology Second Edition Francis Katamba and John Stonham LING 1773 determined by the biology of the brain Universal Grammar the term for the blueprint of language that a human child is born with parameter a feature or category that may
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2011 for the course LING 1777 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '11 term at Pittsburgh.

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book terms - Modern Linguistics: Morphology Second Edition...

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