FIN3300 Solution Ch7 (W 0707)-1

FIN3300 Solution Ch7 (W 0707)-1 - Solution Chapter 7:...

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Solution Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Page 226 Questions: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 2. Price and yield move in opposite directions; if interest rates rise, the price of the bond will fall. This is because the fixed coupon payments determined by the fixed coupon rate are not as valuable when interest rates rise—hence, the price of the bond decreases. NOTE: Most problems do not explicitly list a par value for bonds. Even though a bond can have any par value, in general, corporate bonds in the United States will have a par value of $1,000. We will use this par value in all problems unless a different par value is explicitly stated. 3. The price of any bond is the PV of the interest payment, plus the PV of the par value. Notice this problem assumes an annual coupon. The price of the bond will be: P = $75({1 – [1/(1 + .0875)] 10 } / .0875) + $1,000[1 / (1 + .0875) 10 ] = $918.89 We would like to introduce shorthand notation here. Rather than write (or type, as the case may be) the entire equation for the PV of a lump sum, or the PVA equation,
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2011 for the course FINANCE Fin3300 taught by Professor Mosley during the Summer '10 term at CSU East Bay.

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FIN3300 Solution Ch7 (W 0707)-1 - Solution Chapter 7:...

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