Julius Caesar Essay - Anzum 1 Nishat Anzum Taylor English...

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Anzum 1 Nishat Anzum Taylor English 2-Period 1 22 March 2011 They Are Women, Yet Not During the Elizabethan Times, women were less likely to rule England; however, Queen Elizabeth proved that wrong. Queen Elizabeth’s reign gave women an opportunity to hold a higher position and an incentive for men to respect them for a while. Although she did rule England at one time, her death caused women to revert back to the low statuses men gave them. The fact that Queen Elizabeth helped England prosper did not influence the men to change their opinions about women. Women were still either a “virgin or whore”, nothing more (Riviecchio, Para. 1). In Julius Caesar , William Shakespeare gives women less worth than men. Only two women, Calpurnia and Portia, appear in the tragic play, but the roles they play as women are significantly irrelevant to the story. In other words, Julius Caesar would be the same throughout even if Calpurnia and Portia are not in the story. Shakespeare first shows the irrelevancy of women when Portia pleads Brutus to tell her his secret about the conspiracy, and she wants to comfort him as much as he can, as his wife. Brutus, here, does not consider her feelings and tells her that she does not need to know, and that she should “go to bed” (II. i, l. 260). Although Portia shows Brutus that she is strong by “giving
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Julius Caesar Essay - Anzum 1 Nishat Anzum Taylor English...

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