Critical - It is perhaps not generally known that the Latin American independence movements historically highlighted by the figures of Simn Bolvar

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It is perhaps not generally known that the Latin American independence movements historically highlighted by the figures of Simón Bolívar and José de San Martín were prefaced by several major indigenous rebellions that shook the Spanish dominions to the core. The two renowned South American libertadores were yet to be born or in infancy when José Gabriel Túpac Amaru and his wife Micaela Bastidas led the first and most pronounced rebellion in what is present-day Peru, taking up arms against the Spanish colony and raising armies of thousands of Indian men and women. The central Andean region, including Peru and Bolivia (Alto Peru at the time) witnessed a repopularization of Inca identity as several direct descen- dants of the Inca sovereigns reclaimed their heritage in the line of nobility that had greeted and been subjugated by the Spanish conquest. A new volume of original materials, The Tupac Amaru and Catarista Rebel- lions: An Anthology of Sources, does excellent justice to the historical sidelining suffered by the aforementioned indigenous rebels who attempted to throw off the yoke of servitude in the 1780s as conditions under Spanish authorities became increasingly intolerable. The selection and translation of original sources from the period include court claims, letters, and proclamations of the rebel leaders as well as testimonies of other witnesses and official docu- ments, including confessions and court sentences condemning the defeated to horrible torture and execution. The volume provides English translation to many Spanish-language documents for the first time and is a valuable primary source to the study of these events. The rebellion of José Andres Túpac Amaru and the uprisings of the Catari brothers in the south of Bolivia and Túpac Catari (Julian Apaza) in the area of La Paz are well remembered in the Andean region. Perhaps as many as one hundred thousand people lost their lives during the failed insurrections, which caused widespread disruption of the colonial order and substantial destruction of property. Nevertheless, current political movements of contem- porary descendants in Peru and Bolivia often recall the indigenous challenge of the early 1780s, while the salient figures from the time enjoy popular and even official recognition as heroes in both countries. Many were the causes of the rebellions. The Spanish colony, even nearly
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2011 for the course HIS 39930 taught by Professor Ming during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Critical - It is perhaps not generally known that the Latin American independence movements historically highlighted by the figures of Simn Bolvar

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