CHINA NOTES - Dynastic cycle (Note 2) Dynasties in Imperial...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dynastic cycle ( Note 2) Dynasties in Imperial China Xia (21th-17th C. BC) Shang (17th-11th C. BC) W. Zhou (11 th C.-256 BC) E. Zhou (Warring States, 475-221 BC) Qin (221-206 BC) Han (206 BC-AD 220) Three Kingdoms (220-280) Sui (581-618) Tang (618-907) Five Dynasties (907-960) N. Song (960-1127) S. Song (1127-1279) Yuan (1206-1368) Ming (1368-1644) Qing (1616-1911) Stage 1: land reclamation; light taxation ; efficient government Stage 2: population growth; economic expansion; urbanization Stage 3: expanded government; land concentration ; increased tax burden Stage 4: government corruption and inefficiency; dislocation of the landless; social instability; rebellion/foreign invasion; economy devastated; population wiped out Implications? “Revolution” (geming) as a tradition “Mandate of Heaven” (tianming): source of legitimacy The Communist Revolution and the People’s Republic Sinocentrism ( Note 2) China as the center of the world: Zhongguo y (the Middle Kingdom) China as the only civilized land: Zhonghua/huaxia y /y Why? 1) Geographic isolation
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2) Advanced culture and economy - Farming during the Han (206 BC-AD 220) - Silk weaving during the Qing (1644-1911) - A vase of the Qing - A jar of the Yuan (£ 14,000,000) - Kaifeng, capital of the Song Huangdi (Yellow Emperor Note 3) The Yellow Emperor (Huang Di), Forefather of the Chinese nation The Annual Sacrificial Ritual devoted to the Yellow Emperor Oracle-bone inscriptions ( Note 3) Oracle-bone Inscriptions of the Shang dynasty Well-field system ( Note 3) The First Emperor of the Qin ( Note 3, 4) The First Emperor of Qin (259-210 BC)
Background image of page 2
Emperor Wu of the Han ( Note 4) Emperor Wu (r. 140-86 BC) Administrative centralization Limiting princedoms and marquisates Rule of avoidance Creating “inner court” of eunuchs Circuit inspectors Confucianism as state ideology Dong Zhongshu (179-104 BC) Cosmology: “oneness of man and heaven” Morality and punishment (yin and yang) Wars with the Xiongnu: Early Han: appeasement / intermarriage Emperor Wu: grand campaigns,119 BC Westward migration of the Huns after AD 73 Three Kingdoms ( Note 4) Wei, 220-265 Shu, 221-263 Wu, 222-280 The Battle at Guangdu, A.D. 200 - Cao Cao (20000) vs. Yuan Shao (100,000) Confucius and The Analects Kong Zi (Confucius, 9/28/551 – 479 BC) A Ming-dynasty painting showing that Confucius, in his late years, wrote The Book of Songs, The Book of History, and The Spring and Autumn Annals , and taught his disciples. It is said that Confucius had 3,000 disciples The Apricot Altar, built in memory of Confucius, who is said to have lectured here The Dacheng (Great Achievements) Hall, the main structure of the Temple of Confucius. Under the eaves of the Dacheng Hall are 28 huge stone columns, and each of the nine columns
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

CHINA NOTES - Dynastic cycle (Note 2) Dynasties in Imperial...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online