confucius and confucianism

confucius and confucianism - Confucius and Confucianism...

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Confucius and Confucianism
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Intentional homicide rates
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Kong Zi (Confucius, 9/28/551 – 479 BC)
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China during the (722-481 BC)
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A Ming-dynasty painting showing that Confucius, in his late years, wrote The Book of Songs, The Book of History, and The Spring and Autumn Annals , and taught his disciples. It is said that Confucius had 3,000 disciples
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The Apricot Altar, built in memory of Confucius, who is said to have lectured here
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A memorial archway in front of the Temple of Confucius
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The Dacheng (Great Achievements) Hall, the main structure of the Temple of Confucius.
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The statue of Confucius in the Temple of Confucius
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Under the eaves of the Dacheng Hall are 28 huge stone columns, and each of the nine columns under the front eaves has two carved dragons frolicking with a pearl amid waves and clouds
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The thirteen stone-tablet pavilions in the Temple of Confucius were built under the order of emperors of the Jin (1115-1234), Yuan (1271-1368), and Qing dynasties to house stone tablets with accounts of reconstructions of the temple and of ceremonies honoring Confucius
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The stone-tablet pavilions
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A forest of stone tablets and carvings
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The tomb passage in the Cemetery of Confucius. On the passage stands the Everlasting Memorial Archway, built in 1594
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The Cemetery of Confucius
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The tomb of Confucius
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A memorial ceremony for Confucius
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Lubi Wall. It is said that when the First Emperor of the Qin Dynasty (221-206 B.C.) ordered the burning of the works of Confucius, the ninth- generation descendant of Confucius hid the works in a wall. The Lubi Wall is a copy of the original wall.
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On “Ren” (perfect virtue) Tsze-chang asked Confucius about perfect virtue. Confucius said, “To be able to practice five things everywhere under heaven constitutes perfect virtue." He begged to ask what they were, and was told, " Gravity, generosity of soul, sincerity, earnestness, and kindness . If you are grave, you will not be treated with disrespect. If you are generous, you will win all. If you are sincere, people will repose trust in you. If you are earnest, you will accomplish much. If you are kind, this will enable you to employ the services of others.” (17.5)
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confucius and confucianism - Confucius and Confucianism...

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