4. Freely Falling Bodies - F reely Falling Bodies In the...

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In the 4 th century BC, Aristotle thought that heavy objects fall faster than light objects. 19 centuries later, Galileo argued that bodies should fall with downward acceleration n that is constant and is independent of its weight. Galileo was right, the motion of falling has since been studied with great precision (when effects of the air can be neglected). In the absence of frictional drag, an object near the surface of the earth will fall with the constant acceleration of gravity g. Position and speed at any time can be calculated from the motion equations. Illustrated here is the situation where an object is released from rest. It's position and speed can be predicted for any time after that. Since all the quantities are directed downward, that direction is chosen as the positive direction in this case. Acceleration due to gravity 2 2 2 32 980 8 . 9 s ft s cm s m g earth - = - = - = 2 6 . 1 s m g moon - = 2 270 s m g sun - = Using the equations with constant acceleration, we have: 1. gt
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2011 for the course PHYSICS 10 taught by Professor Darp during the Spring '11 term at Mapúa Institute of Technology.

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4. Freely Falling Bodies - F reely Falling Bodies In the...

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