Lecture9[1] - Lecture 9 Basic Counting Rule Section 4.1...

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Basic Counting Rule Section 4.1 1 STAT 225, Dallas Bateman, Spring 2010 Lecture 9
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Combinatorics Many interesting events and samples spaces have far two many outcomes to be able to list them all. Example: How many possible outcomes are there in flipping a coin 6 times? 64 2 STAT 225, Dallas Bateman, Spring 2010
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Combinatorics In these situations listing all outcomes is unpractical and usually we do not care about each individual outcome in an event or sample space, we care only about how many outcomes there are. We will study the science of “counting rules” called Combinatorics that will allow us to count quickly. 3 STAT 225, Dallas Bateman, Spring 2010
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Combinatorics Additional situations where combinatorics is “useful”: There are 2,598,960 different ways to deal a poker hand. There are 1024 ways to flip a coin ten times There are 13,983,816 ways to select 6 out of 49 lottery numbers (and only one of these combinations is the winner) 4 STAT 225, Dallas Bateman, Spring 2010
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2011 for the course STAT 225 taught by Professor Martin during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Lecture9[1] - Lecture 9 Basic Counting Rule Section 4.1...

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