8_sig_test - Significance Testing Statistical testing of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Significance Testing Statistical testing of the mean Binomial Distribution Mathematicians have figured formulas to estimate long run relative frequencies for simple events, like how many heads will appear for a given number of coin tosses. The binomial is one such. 12 10 8 6 4 2-2 PROB .3 .2 .1 0.0-.1 Number of heads in 10 flips of a coin. Recall dice Normal Distribution We have already figured percentages of the normal. Percentages of the normal correspond to probabilities of finding individual cases in the distribution. The sampling distribution of the mean is normal if N is large. 3 2 1-1-2-3 Scores in standard deviations from mu 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 Probability (Relative Frequency) Standard Normal Curve Standard Normal Curve Standard Normal Curve Standard Normal Curve 50 Percent 34.13 % 13.59% 2.15% Middle 95 percent from going up and down 1.96 SDs from the mean. Significance Testing 1 Significance testing is a what if game. We make an assumption, and ask what will happen if the assumption is true. Assumption is null hypothesis . Significance testing is based on probabilities that come from the what if scenario (from the null hypothesis). What if the true mean height of students at USF is 66 inches and SD is 5 inches? What if we draw people from USF 100 at a time and plot the means?...
View Full Document

Page1 / 14

8_sig_test - Significance Testing Statistical testing of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online