Shorty - Short Title 1 Running head: CONDENSED TITLE IN...

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Short Title 1 Running head: CONDENSED TITLE IN CAPS The Descriptive Title of the Manuscript: Center Between Left and Right Margins and Double-Space Author(s) Names(s) Organizational Affiliation This box would not appear on a real paper, but gives credit where it is due. Sally Beaton and Ray Kirby of Old Dominion University were the original developers of this sample paper. Revised by Pamela Novy, University of Vermont, 2/96.
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Short Title 2 Abstract The abstract is a brief summary, typically 75-100 words (no more than 960 characters, including spaces), of the purpose and content of the paper. The abstract is typed in block form (a single paragraph with no indentation) and is written last, after the paper is finished. The abstract is often used by the reader to determine whether or not the paper will be read in its entirety; therefore, each sentence should be accurate and maximally informative. The abstract typically contains about six sentences. The first sentence introduces and describes the general problem under investigation. The second sentence provides pertinent information about the subjects, including sample size and selection criteria. The third and fourth sentences summarize the overall methodology including independent and dependent variables. The fifth sentence summarizes the main results. The final sentence states the general conclusions and implications of the study. If you have access to a copy of the APA Manual, refer to pages 12-15 for more information.
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Short Title 3 The Descriptive Title of the Manuscript: Center Between Left and Right Margins and Double-Space The introduction starts on a new page and is the only section of the manuscript not labeled with a heading; instead, the full title precedes the Introduction, typed exactly as it appears on the title page. The Introduction serves three basic purposes: (a) to introduce the problem, (b) to develop the background information, and (c) to provide the reader with a clear statement of the purpose and rationale of the study. The tone of the Introduction should be one of reporting, not creative narrative. Technical writing is not the same as creative writing, and you are generally reporting, in an objective manner, research that has been done or is about to be done, and why. Avoid strong opinions and value judgments. Organization and Writing the Introduction The most difficult part or organizing and writing an Introduction is the development of a logical connection between the current body of literature and your research design. The articles that you select to use in your Introduction should all be related to your topic, but not necessarily identical to it. The independent variable in an article may be the same conceptually, but not operationally defined the way you did, and the dependent variable may be completely different. But if you can still relate the article to what you have done, then it may be a good article to use. Each article should add a little more information (and maybe even some
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2011 for the course PSY 3213 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of South Florida - Tampa.

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Shorty - Short Title 1 Running head: CONDENSED TITLE IN...

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