NEWGenomics I - Genomes can be compared by pulsed-field gel...

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11 Genomes can be compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is used to separate individual chromosomes or large pieces of chromosomes. Unlike gel electrophoresis, PFGE uses alternating pulses of current that are applied to the gel from different directions. PFGE is used in physical mapping to purify large pieces of DNA to construct a library, and to coarsely map the locations of genes. Cloned genes can be used in Southern blots to locate a gene on a chromosome. An example of a PFGE gel is shown in Figure 20.19. Part (a) of this figure illustrates a separation of yeast chromosomes that have not been digested with restriction enzymes. Part (b) shows a separation of a bacterial chromosome that has been digested with three restriction enzymes. In the past, PFGE was often used to isolate large pieces of chromosomes to construct contigs. In recent years, PFGE has been most commonly used to identify species of microorganisms or strains of the same species. For example, some strains of
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2011 for the course BIO 325 taught by Professor Saxena during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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NEWGenomics I - Genomes can be compared by pulsed-field gel...

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