Unit 5 Review

Unit 5 Review - Unit 5 Review Guide 1. The Constitution...

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Unit 5 Review Guide 1. The Constitution does not give power of Judicial Review to the Supreme Court 2. Marbury v. Madison set the precedent for ^ 3. Appellate Jurisdiction cases are the largest share of cases that the Supreme Court hears 4. Currently, the only original jurisdiction cases commonly handled by the Supreme Court are disputes between two or more U.S. states, typically regarding boundary lines, water claims, or other property issues. Federal courts are granted original jurisdiction in cases involving interpretations of United States laws, maritime law, cases involving citizens of different states, cases between ambassadors and representatives of foreign nations, cases between state governments, and cases in which the United States is a party. 5. The United States Constitution does not specify the size of the Supreme Court; instead, Article III of the Constitution gives Congress the power to fix the number of Justices. The President chooses the justices and the Congress must confirm. Usually there is an odd number for voting reasons; currently
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2011 for the course GOVT 1 taught by Professor Boener during the Spring '11 term at Troy.

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Unit 5 Review - Unit 5 Review Guide 1. The Constitution...

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