Tutorial Operational Amplifiers

Tutorial Operational Amplifiers - deal Operational...

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deal Operational Amplifiers As well as resistors and capacitors, Operational Amplifiers , or Op-amps as they are more commonly called, are one of the basic building blocks of Analogue Electronic Circuits. Operational amplifiers are linear devices that have all the properties required for nearly ideal DC amplification and are therefore used extensively in signal conditioning, filtering or to perform mathematical operations such as add, subtract, integration and differentiation. An ideal Operational Amplifier is basically a three-terminal device which consists of two high impedance inputs, one called the Inverting Input , marked with a negative sign, (" - ") and the other one called the Non-inverting Input , marked with a positive plus sign (" + "). The third terminal represents the op-amps output port which can both sink and source either a voltage or a current. In a linear operational amplifier, the output signal is the amplification factor, known as the amplifiers gain ( A ) multiplied by the value of the input signal and depending on the nature of these input and output signals, there can be four different classifications of operational amplifier gain. Voltage – Voltage "in" and Voltage "out" Current – Current "in" and Current "out" Transconductance – Voltage "in" and Current "out" Transresistance – Current "in" and Voltage "out" Since most of the circuits dealing with operational amplifiers are voltage amplifiers, we will limit the tutorials in this section to voltage amplifiers only, (Vin and Vout). The amplified output signal of an Operational Amplifier is the difference between the two signals being applied to the two inputs. In other words the output signal is a differential signal between the two inputs and the input stage of an Operational Amplifier is in fact a differential amplifier as shown below. Differential Amplifier The circuit below shows a generalized form of a differential amplifier with two inputs marked V1 and V2 . The two identical transistors TR1 and TR2 are both biased at the same operating point with their emitters connected together and returned to the common rail, -Vee by way of resistor Re . Differential Amplifier
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The circuit operates from a dual supply +Vcc and -Vee which ensures a constant supply. The voltage that appears at the output, Vout of the amplifier is the difference between the two input signals as the two base inputs are in anti-phase with each other. So as the forward bias of transistor, TR1 is increased, the forward bias of transistor TR2 is reduced and vice versa. Then if the two transistors are perfectly matched, the current flowing through the common emitter resistor, Re will remain constant. Like the input signal, the output signal is also balanced and since the collector voltages either swing in opposite directions (anti-
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Tutorial Operational Amplifiers - deal Operational...

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