10-11 Latin American Music outline

10-11 Latin American Music outline - GMUS 203: Music in...

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GMUS 203: Music in America Fall semester 2009 Mexican Musical Traditions in the U.S. – strongest from mexico Pre-Columbian Mexico Mayan and Aztec empires Spanish conquistadores 1519 Mexican Independence 1824 Border Conflicts with U.S. 1910-1924 Mexican Revolution Mestizo culture @ 35 million Latinos in the U.S. 60% Mexican Mexican Son (Sound) style – african and Spanish influence SPANISH INFLUENCES Instruments guitar and violin harmony Literary forms AFRICAN INFLUENCES polyrhythm sesquialtera Son Jarocho Veracruz (Southeast Gulf coast) Instrumentation: Harp (arpa) Requinto Jarana Two singers LISTEN: “La Bamba” prominent harp Traditional version (son jarocho style) Earliest reported performance 1755 Ritchie Valens scored a Top 40 hit in 1958 1
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GMUS 203: Music in America Fall semester 2009 Mariachi – small string group Jalisco (S.W.) son jalisciense Instruments: violins vihuela - guitar guitarrón - bass Mariachi Culture Costume Traje de charro Violins, vihuela, guitarrón, trumpets Accompany singers and dance LISTEN: “Las Arrieros” (The Muleteers) Performed by Mariachi Los Camperos Norteño – associated with the border Rancheras - “ranch songs” most popular (Mexican country) very emotional “Bel Canto” singing style LISTEN: “Gracias” – very slow José Alfredo Jimenez with Mariachi Vargas 2
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10-11 Latin American Music outline - GMUS 203: Music in...

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