007431.pdf - LESSON 4 THE GILDED AGE TO THE 1920S The...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 53 pages.

The growth of big business and industry led to a wide variety of prob- lems faced by the common American worker. These problems and the Progressive response begin Lesson 4. During this time, Americans struggled with adapting to industrialization, realities of mod- ern life, and expanding of representative government at home. But this was also when the United States began its first earnest efforts toward becoming a world power. Involve- ment with foreign affairs brought the United States into World War I. This lesson closes as the United States indulged in the roaring 1920s, facing changing cultural values while enjoying a booming economy. ASSIGNMENT 1 SEGREGATION AND SOCIAL TENSIONS Read this section in your study guide. Then read Section 1 of Chapter 16 in your textbook. AFRICAN AMERICANS LOSE FREEDOMS After the end of Reconstruction, southern states enacted several measures to make sure African Americans would lose the right to vote and set up Jim Crow laws, which kept blacks and whites separated. © PENN FOSTER, INC. 2015 AMERICAN HISTORY PAGE 4 1 Lesson 4 LESSON 4 THE GILDED AGE TO THE 1920 S ASSIGNMENT OBJECTIVES When you complete Assignment 1 of Lesson 4, you’ll be able to 1.1 Describe discrimination faced by minority groups in the United States in the late 1800s 1.2 Explain the importance of the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision 1.3 Identify the challenges faced by the women’s rights movement in the late 1800s
© PENN FOSTER, INC. 2015 AMERICAN HISTORY PAGE 4 2 Lesson 4 To limit voting, southern states skirted the Fifteenth Amendment by putting in place poll taxes, which required people to pay $1 to $2 to vote. Literacy tests were also put in place. Since African Americans were more likely than whites to be poor and uneducated, black voters were hurt by these laws. Southern states also put grandfather clauses in place, which allowed a person to vote as long as their ancestors voted prior to 1866. Since blacks weren’t allowed to vote before that time, these clauses unfairly targeted African Americans. Throughout the South, black voting dropped significantly. Jim Crow laws made widespread segregation a reality. Segregation laws were upheld by the Supreme Court in the Plessy v. Ferguson case (1896). This decision stated that segregation laws didn’t violate the Fourteenth Amendment. Because of this decision, segregation would be constitutional for decades to come. AFRICAN AMERICANS OPPOSE INJUSTICES African Americans didn’t simply accept the status as second-class citizens. They estab- lished schools and political associations and spoke out for equality. While they all had the goal of equality, the methods for getting there differed. Booker T. Washington argued that blacks should find their own success without relying on the repeal of segregation laws.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture