p3 - Structs, Enums, and Arrays, Oh My! EECS 280 - Winter...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Structs, Enums, and Arrays, Oh My! EECS 280 -- Winter 2008 Out: February 1st Due: March 4th, 11:59 PM I. Introduction Monopoly is a classic Parker Brothers board game built around buying, selling, and developing property. Each player acquires property over the course of the game. Thereafter, when a player lands on a square "owned" by another, the player must pay "rent" to that owner. The rules of movement for this game are relatively complex, so it is natural to wonder whether some squares are landed upon more often than others. If so, those squares are proportionally more valuable than those landed upon less frequently. All other things being equal, a strategic player would prefer to acquire popular properties in favor of unpopular ones. In this project, you will write a simulator incorporating the rules of movement for the game. In the course of building this simulator, you will use some of C++'s I/O mechanisms and will gain experience using enumerations, structures, and arrays. The specification proceeds as follows. First, Section II presents the structure of Monopoly and the rules relevant to the problem at hand. Section III describes the arguments your program must accept, and the output your simulator must produce. Section IV describes the requirements and restrictions placed on your implementation of the simulator. Section V gives some hints we think will be helpful in completing the project. Section VI concludes with administrative details. II. Monopoly --- Rules of Movement According to Hasbro, the current owner of the franchise, Monopoly is the best-selling board game in the world. It is sold in 80 countries and produced in 26 languages. For our purposes, we only need to concern ourselves with the elements and rules of game play that direct the movement of players. The official Monopoly board has 40 squares and two decks of 16 cards each---the Chance deck and the Community Chest deck. Each square belongs to one of nine categories: * Go: the square on which each player starts at the beginning of the game. * Properties: squares that may be bought, sold or developed. * Railroads: a specific kind of property. * Utilities: another specific kind of property. * Chance: directs a player to draw a card from the Chance deck, follow its instructions, and replace the card on the bottom of the deck.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
* Community Chest: directs a player to draw a card from the Community Chest deck, follow its instructions, and replace the card on the bottom of the deck. * Jail: a special square that plays a role in a variety of movement rules. * Go to Jail: another special square that plays a role in movement. * Other: squares belonging to none of the above categories. Each card belongs to one of five categories: * Absolute move: directs a player to a specific square. * Relative move: directs a player to move either forward or
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course EECS 215 taught by Professor Phillips during the Winter '08 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 12

p3 - Structs, Enums, and Arrays, Oh My! EECS 280 - Winter...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online