Morality and Law 6

Morality and Law 6 - Interpretation means showing the...

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Dworkin 2 Thursday, February 17, 2011 12:29 PM Main ideas Lesson of courtesy 2 components of the interpretive attitude Courtesy has value Requirements are sensitive to point/meaning Not merely mechanical Is this an analogue or critique of hart's internal aspect Dworkin's theory of interpreting social practice: creative interpretation Creative interp is consturcutive Is interaction between purpose and object Where do objects get purposes Dworkin "constructive interpretation is a matter of imposing purpose on an object or practice in order to make of it the best possible example of the form or genre to which it is taken to belong" (52) Dworkin says there are constraint on constructive interpretation Are there really constraints? Objection: creative "interpreation' is not interpretation at all Interppretation requires discovering the author's tru motives or intentions
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Unformatted text preview: Interpretation means showing the object accuratley, not foising the interpreter's values on it Conversational interpretation is the best theory Intent of the author is not a sneutral or pure as the critic makes it sound What are the complexities that dworkin points out Int applies intention Different aspects or levels of intent could conflice Interpreter's sense of vlue influences his reconstruction of the author's intention (not entirely open-ended) 3 misunderstandings Dworkin is not arguing that the author's intention theory is wrong Nor is he arguing that an interpreter trying to reconstruct an author's intention thinks the author has some grand theory connecting intention to value Nor is he arguing that the interpreter must be consciously trying to improve the thing being interpreted....
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2011 for the course PHIL 280 taught by Professor Hubbs during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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