Chap3_Sec7_Chemistry

Chap3_Sec7_Chemistry - CHEMISTRY Example 4 A chemical...

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A chemical reaction results in the formation of one or more substances (products) from one or more starting materials (reactants). s For instance, the ‘equation’ 2H 2 + O 2 2H 2 O indicates that two molecules of hydrogen and one molecule of oxygen form two molecules of water. CHEMISTRY Example 4
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Let’s consider the reaction A + B C where A and B are the reactants and C is the product. s The concentration of a reactant A is the number of moles (6.022 X 10 23 molecules) per liter and is denoted by [A]. s The concentration varies during a reaction. s So, [A], [B], and [C] are all functions of time ( t ). CONCENTRATION Example 4
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The average rate of reaction of the product C over a time interval t 1 t t 2 is: 2 1 2 1 [ ]( ) [ ]( ) [ ] C t C t C t t t - Δ = Δ - AVERAGE RATE Example 4
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However, chemists are more interested in the instantaneous rate of reaction. s This is obtained by taking the limit of the average rate of reaction as the time interval t approaches 0: rate of reaction = 0 [ ] [ ] lim t C d C t dt Δ → Δ = Δ Example 4 INSTANTANEOUS RATE
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Chap3_Sec7_Chemistry - CHEMISTRY Example 4 A chemical...

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